BLURRING THE COLOR LINE

What did it mean to be Chinese in Black neighborhoods during segregation in the 1930s? Which fountain did the Chinese drink from? Where did they sit on the bus? Following director Crystal Kwok’s personal journey of discovery, BLURRING THE COLOR LINE digs deep into how her grandmother’s family navigated life as neighborhood grocery store owners in the Black community of Augusta, Georgia during the Jim Crow era.

The film weaves personal family stories with memories from the larger Chinese and Black communities, opening up uncomfortable but necessary conversations around anti-Black racism and the deeply rooted structure of white power and Chinese patriarchy that contributed to this sentiment.

The stories they discuss and choose to remember offer a nuanced look into how two seemingly different communities shared a connective history that illuminates the roots of America’s problematic racial history. This film opens critical conversations on where the Chinese community fit into the black and white dichotomy of the segregated south; how anti-blackness was established and perpetuated; and how marginal groups were pitted against each other in the hierarchical structure of white supremacy.

And now in 2022, it is important for all marginalized communities to come together and be stronger to fight the ever-increasing presence of racial hate and prejudice.

Showtimes

Credits

DIRECTOR(S)Crystal Kwok
SCREENWRITER(S)Crystal Kwok
CASTCrystal Kwok, Stephen Wong, Cedric Sturgis
CINEMATOGRAPHERLou Nakasano, Lester Lowry

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Details

PREMIERE STATUS: Hawai‘i Premiere

countries:

YEAR: 2022
RUN TIME: 76 Minutes
LANGUAGE: English

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